Some Thoughts on Language Use in Therapy by Steve de Shazer (1997)

May 27, 2009

ABSTRACT: Drawing on the work of Ludwig Wittgenstein and his own experience as a therapist and educator/trainer, the author describes some of the issues involved in helping therapists to find their way out of various muddles and mazes that are deeply embedded in language.

First published in Contemporary Family Therapy, 19(1), March 1997, 133-141

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Gale Miller: The man behind the mirror behind the mirror at BFTC, interview by Mark McKergow

May 27, 2009

Abstract

Professor Gale Miller is a member of the Department of Social and Cultural Sciences at Marquette University, Milwaukee. He is interested in research around issues involving language and social problems, and was involved as a researcher with Steve de Shazer, Insoo Kim Berg and their team at the Brief Family Therapy Centre during the evolution of what we now know as SF therapy. These observations led to his book Becoming Miracle Workers: Language and Meaning in Brief Therapy (1997). He continues to be involved with the SF community around the world.

Special first issue offer – download the paper FREE from http://www.asfct.org/documents/journal/2009-05/gale_miller.pdf.

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Making It Happen With Your Team by Paul Z Jackson and Colin Coombs

May 27, 2009

Abstract

Tate hired ‘The Solutions Focus’ for a departmental teambuilding. This article follows the design, delivery and results of the assignment.

Special first issue offer – download the paper FREE at http://www.asfct.org/documents/journal/2009-05/making_it_happen.pdf. 

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The Grammar of Neuroscience: What can and cannot be said about brains and minds by Kirsten Dierolf MA PCC and Mark McKergow PhD MBA

May 27, 2009

Abstract

While we are encouraged by the appearance of articles about neuroscience which support SF practice, we urge caution in interpreting these findings on three grounds. The different grammars of neuroscience (molecular grammar) and SF practice (people grammar) are not transposable, and according to Wittgenstein one cannot be reduced to the other. There is a risk of falling for the mereological fallacy – applying to a part (a brain) something which can only be applied to a whole (a person). Finally, the fundamentally social aspect of language calls into question our everyday assumptions about the links between mind, brain and language. Wittgenstein and others offer a way to say what can be said clearly, and to be as unmuddled as possible in our investigations and discussions.

Special first issue offer – download the paper FREE from http://www.asfct.org/documents/journal/2009-05/the_grammar_of_neuroscience.pdf. 

Please add your comments below.


Exploring what works: Is SF the best way of harnessing the impact of positive psychology in the workplace? by Carey Glass M.Sc, C. Psychol

May 27, 2009
Abstract
Contemporary research is demonstrating the power of positive psychology in the workplace. Work linking positive psychology and SF is, however, at its genesis and untested. This article asks two questions: First, does SF operate as a methodology for bringing the fruits of positive psychology into the workplace? Second, if it does, what does this mean for the practice of SF? What aspects should we focus on to maximise what works? This will be examined through the ground breaking work of Barbara Frederickson. Frederickson’s (2001) broaden-and-build theory of positive emotions will be considered and the evidence supporting it outlined. Hypotheses about the links between it, other cognate research and techniques used within SF will be examined to answer these questions.
 
Special first issue offer – download the paper FREE at http://www.asfct.org/documents/journal/2009-05/exploring_what_works.pdf
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Solution Focused Conflict Management in Teams and in Organisations by Drs. Fredrike P. Bannink MDR

May 27, 2009

Abstract

Rather than dwelling on the conflict, solution focused conflict management asks: what would you prefer instead of the conflict? The focus is on the preferred future of the team or organisation. Clients are considered capable of formulating their vision and of devising solutions that bring this hoped-for outcome closer. The expertise of the solution focused mediator lies in asking questions which help clients in this respect and in motivating clients to change. Conversations become positive and shorter.

Special offer – download the paper as a FREE pdf from http://www.asfct.org/documents/journal/2009-05/sf_conflict_management. 

Please add your comments about the paper below!  Thanks.


About the InterAction journal and blog

May 27, 2009

InterAction is the new journal from SFCT – the professional organisation for Solution Focus in organisations.  You can read more about SFCT at http://www.asfct.org

This blog will host discussions about the papers published in InterAction.  Details of the journal itself are at http://www.asfct.org/journal.php.  Each paper will have its own strand of comments and reflections, and the whole thing will be linked to the SFCT webpage.  The comments thread is public and anyone can comment on the papers and topics.