Interview: Ben Furman: SF Respects the Not Invented Here Syndrome

December 16, 2009

Dr. Ben Furman is a psychiatrist and inspirational speaker and author from Finland. He is renowned his practical adaptations of the solution focused approach in different settings. In Kids’ Skills, people involved in the upbringing of children learn how to encourage children to develop the skills they need to overcome their difficulties. Together with his colleague Tapani Ahola he created the Twin Star and Reteaming models as practical applications of the solution focus in organisations. The first offers very practical suggestions on how to improve the psychosocial environment of the workplace. The latter presents concrete steps to motivate people to change. One characteristic in Ben Furman’s approach is the avoidance of blame storming. Talking about problems and what caused them quickly leads to accusations and excuses. These can be overcome by engaging in “solution talk”: talking about what you want instead of the problem and what can be done to get there. Another constant in his work is his interactive perspective: “We work with teams even when we work with individuals.”

The full interview is available in the SFCT journal InterAction.  Please add your comments to the interview below.

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Gale Miller: The man behind the mirror behind the mirror at BFTC, interview by Mark McKergow

May 27, 2009

Abstract

Professor Gale Miller is a member of the Department of Social and Cultural Sciences at Marquette University, Milwaukee. He is interested in research around issues involving language and social problems, and was involved as a researcher with Steve de Shazer, Insoo Kim Berg and their team at the Brief Family Therapy Centre during the evolution of what we now know as SF therapy. These observations led to his book Becoming Miracle Workers: Language and Meaning in Brief Therapy (1997). He continues to be involved with the SF community around the world.

Special first issue offer – download the paper FREE from http://www.asfct.org/documents/journal/2009-05/gale_miller.pdf.

Please add your comments below.